Brexit House of Cards | by Mark Malloch-Brown – Project Syndicate

House of Cards
LONDON – Britain’s long-running Brexit saga has thrown up a new argument. Does Prime Minister Boris Johnson have a cunning plan for conjuring up a new and improved exit deal, or is he just dragging the United Kingdom over the “no-deal” cliff edge? The Trump Narrative and the Next Recession Andrew Harnik/AFP/Getty Images Robert J. Shiller thinks an economic downturn could upend a public story that has persisted and grown for nearly 50 years. 29 Add to Bookmarks Whither Central Banking? erhui1979/Getty Images 21 Add to Bookmarks Will Boris Johnson’s Political Coup Succeed? Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images Anatole Kaletsky explains why the UK prime minister's move to suspend Parliament could prove to be a savvy calculation. 13 Add to Bookmarks The highest court in Scotland has ruled Johnson’s prorogation of Parliament to be unlawful, and the House of Commons has forced him to release the gloriously named Operation Yellowhammer document, which contains a highly damaging official assessment of the catastrophic impact of a no-deal Brexit. The latest divisions within the Conservative Party – including the ouster of 21 MPs who opposed Johnson’s approach to Brexit – appear to ....


During those surreal hours, when members of the House of Lords (usually a pretty sedate place) broke a rare filibuster by government loyalists, I ran into my fellow peer Michael Dobbs, the author of House of Cards. We wondered what was left for his writing now that facts of political intrigue have so outstripped fiction. The villain protagonist of the story, Prime Minister Francis Urquhart (or US President Frank Underwood in the American TV series), seems like a sober and respectable political operator compared to many current UK political leaders. The question now, of course, is whether Johnson has a plan – or at least a compass – for navigating the chaos he helped unleash. A best guess depends on where one sits, and how one is accustomed to thinking about uncertainty. Those rationalists who are in the business of assessing political and financial risk seem to think that Johnson does have a plan. .

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